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Stephen Dadugblor

Assistant Professor
location_on Ponderosa Office Annex Room 13

Research / Teaching Area

Education

Ph.D. in English (concentration in Rhetoric and Writing), The University of Texas at Austin, May 2021.
Dissertation: Deliberating About Elections: Democracy, Cultural Imaginaries, and Rhetorical Practices in Postcolonial Ghana
Committee: Patricia Roberts-Miller (Director), Clay Spinuzzi (Co-director), Jacqueline Henkel, Rasha Diab, Robert Asen
M.S., Rhetoric, Theory & Culture, Michigan Technological University, May 2016.
B.A., English & Sociology (First Class Honors), University of Ghana, May 2013.
Semester Study, Justus Liebig University, Giessen, Germany, March–August 2012.

About

Stephen Dadugblor earned a PhD in English (concentration in Rhetoric and Writing) from The University of Texas at Austin. His research is situated in cultural and comparative rhetorics, public deliberation, and rhetorical genre studies, with special attention to the rhetorical practices of postcolonial African societies. His work attends to the ways that cultural imaginaries inflect citizens’ participation in postcolonial African democracies. His scholarship has appeared in or is forthcoming at Praxis: A Writing Center Journal, The Routledge Handbook of Comparative World Rhetorics, and College Composition and Communication, among others.

Publications

Dadugblor, Stephen Kwame, et al. “Archiving Our Own: The Digital Archive of Rhetoric and Composition at the University of Texas at Austin, 1975-1995.” College Composition and Communication (forthcoming 2022).

Dadugblor, Stephen Kwame. “Collaboration and Conflict in Writing Center Session Notes.” Praxis: A Writing Center Journal, vol. 18, no. 2, 2021, pp. 74-83.

Dadugblor, Stephen Kwame. “Usable Presents: Hybridity in/for Postcolonial African Rhetorics.” Routledge Handbook on Comparative/World Rhetorics, edited by Keith Lloyd, Routledge, 2020, pp. 250-258.

Coker, Wincharles, and Stephen Kwame Dadugblor. “A Rhetoric of Visual Humor on Facebook.” Analyzing Language and Humor in Online Communication, edited by Rotimi Taiwo, Akinola Odebunmi, and Akin Adetunji. IGI Global, 2016, pp. 101-113.


Additional Description

WRDS 150A: Digital Technologies and Political Participation

The proliferation of digital technologies has enabled the generation, storage, and processing of data
on unprecedented scales, with implications for our social and political lives. In this course, we will
focus on social networking sites as an example of such technologies to examine how they shape
citizens’ participation in politics and democratic processes. We will discuss key concerns regarding
the practice of politics and democracy today: digital activism, fake news, misinformation/disinformation, and demagoguery, among others. We will read research by scholars across multiple disciplines who study the connection between social networking sites and political participation across cultures. As we discuss these scholarly articles, we will gain familiarity with knowledge-making in the disciplines, learn scholarly conventions of academic discourse communities, and participate effectively as apprentice members.


Stephen Dadugblor

Assistant Professor
location_on Ponderosa Office Annex Room 13

Ph.D. in English (concentration in Rhetoric and Writing), The University of Texas at Austin, May 2021.
Dissertation: Deliberating About Elections: Democracy, Cultural Imaginaries, and Rhetorical Practices in Postcolonial Ghana
Committee: Patricia Roberts-Miller (Director), Clay Spinuzzi (Co-director), Jacqueline Henkel, Rasha Diab, Robert Asen
M.S., Rhetoric, Theory & Culture, Michigan Technological University, May 2016.
B.A., English & Sociology (First Class Honors), University of Ghana, May 2013.
Semester Study, Justus Liebig University, Giessen, Germany, March–August 2012.

Stephen Dadugblor earned a PhD in English (concentration in Rhetoric and Writing) from The University of Texas at Austin. His research is situated in cultural and comparative rhetorics, public deliberation, and rhetorical genre studies, with special attention to the rhetorical practices of postcolonial African societies. His work attends to the ways that cultural imaginaries inflect citizens' participation in postcolonial African democracies. His scholarship has appeared in or is forthcoming at Praxis: A Writing Center Journal, The Routledge Handbook of Comparative World Rhetorics, and College Composition and Communication, among others.
Dadugblor, Stephen Kwame, et al. “Archiving Our Own: The Digital Archive of Rhetoric and Composition at the University of Texas at Austin, 1975-1995.” College Composition and Communication (forthcoming 2022).

Dadugblor, Stephen Kwame. "Collaboration and Conflict in Writing Center Session Notes.” Praxis: A Writing Center Journal, vol. 18, no. 2, 2021, pp. 74-83.

Dadugblor, Stephen Kwame. “Usable Presents: Hybridity in/for Postcolonial African Rhetorics.” Routledge Handbook on Comparative/World Rhetorics, edited by Keith Lloyd, Routledge, 2020, pp. 250-258.

Coker, Wincharles, and Stephen Kwame Dadugblor. “A Rhetoric of Visual Humor on Facebook.” Analyzing Language and Humor in Online Communication, edited by Rotimi Taiwo, Akinola Odebunmi, and Akin Adetunji. IGI Global, 2016, pp. 101-113.

WRDS 150A: Digital Technologies and Political Participation

The proliferation of digital technologies has enabled the generation, storage, and processing of data
on unprecedented scales, with implications for our social and political lives. In this course, we will
focus on social networking sites as an example of such technologies to examine how they shape
citizens’ participation in politics and democratic processes. We will discuss key concerns regarding
the practice of politics and democracy today: digital activism, fake news, misinformation/disinformation, and demagoguery, among others. We will read research by scholars across multiple disciplines who study the connection between social networking sites and political participation across cultures. As we discuss these scholarly articles, we will gain familiarity with knowledge-making in the disciplines, learn scholarly conventions of academic discourse communities, and participate effectively as apprentice members.

Stephen Dadugblor

Assistant Professor
location_on Ponderosa Office Annex Room 13

Ph.D. in English (concentration in Rhetoric and Writing), The University of Texas at Austin, May 2021.
Dissertation: Deliberating About Elections: Democracy, Cultural Imaginaries, and Rhetorical Practices in Postcolonial Ghana
Committee: Patricia Roberts-Miller (Director), Clay Spinuzzi (Co-director), Jacqueline Henkel, Rasha Diab, Robert Asen
M.S., Rhetoric, Theory & Culture, Michigan Technological University, May 2016.
B.A., English & Sociology (First Class Honors), University of Ghana, May 2013.
Semester Study, Justus Liebig University, Giessen, Germany, March–August 2012.

Stephen Dadugblor earned a PhD in English (concentration in Rhetoric and Writing) from The University of Texas at Austin. His research is situated in cultural and comparative rhetorics, public deliberation, and rhetorical genre studies, with special attention to the rhetorical practices of postcolonial African societies. His work attends to the ways that cultural imaginaries inflect citizens' participation in postcolonial African democracies. His scholarship has appeared in or is forthcoming at Praxis: A Writing Center Journal, The Routledge Handbook of Comparative World Rhetorics, and College Composition and Communication, among others.
Dadugblor, Stephen Kwame, et al. “Archiving Our Own: The Digital Archive of Rhetoric and Composition at the University of Texas at Austin, 1975-1995.” College Composition and Communication (forthcoming 2022).

Dadugblor, Stephen Kwame. "Collaboration and Conflict in Writing Center Session Notes.” Praxis: A Writing Center Journal, vol. 18, no. 2, 2021, pp. 74-83.

Dadugblor, Stephen Kwame. “Usable Presents: Hybridity in/for Postcolonial African Rhetorics.” Routledge Handbook on Comparative/World Rhetorics, edited by Keith Lloyd, Routledge, 2020, pp. 250-258.

Coker, Wincharles, and Stephen Kwame Dadugblor. “A Rhetoric of Visual Humor on Facebook.” Analyzing Language and Humor in Online Communication, edited by Rotimi Taiwo, Akinola Odebunmi, and Akin Adetunji. IGI Global, 2016, pp. 101-113.

WRDS 150A: Digital Technologies and Political Participation

The proliferation of digital technologies has enabled the generation, storage, and processing of data
on unprecedented scales, with implications for our social and political lives. In this course, we will
focus on social networking sites as an example of such technologies to examine how they shape
citizens’ participation in politics and democratic processes. We will discuss key concerns regarding
the practice of politics and democracy today: digital activism, fake news, misinformation/disinformation, and demagoguery, among others. We will read research by scholars across multiple disciplines who study the connection between social networking sites and political participation across cultures. As we discuss these scholarly articles, we will gain familiarity with knowledge-making in the disciplines, learn scholarly conventions of academic discourse communities, and participate effectively as apprentice members.