Rebecca Carruthers den Hoed

Assistant Professor of Teaching

Research / Teaching Area

Education

Ph.D. Communication Studies, University of Calgary
M.A. English (Rhetoric), Simon Fraser Univeristy
B.A. Mathematics and Rhetoric & Professional Writing, University of Waterloo

About

Dr. Rebecca Carruthers Den Hoed is an Assistant Professor of Teaching in the School of Journalism, Writing, and Media at UBC. Her teaching and research are focused on academic discourse, academic writing across the disciplines, research genres and genre instruction, team based learning (TBL) in writing intensive courses, discourses of science/health/environment, and discourses of food citizenship. She is especially interested studying discourses of food citizenship as a nexus for broader debates about science/health/environment.

Rebecca has taught academic writing, rhetorical theory and practice, professional and technical communication, and science and health communication at Canadian universities for nearly twenty years. She has taught at the University of Calgary and the University of Lethbridge in Alberta, and is currently teaching at the University of British Columbia.

 


Publications

Richards, G.W. & Carruthers Den Hoed, R. (2018). Seven strategies of climate change science communication for policy change: Combining academic theory with practical evidence from science-policy partnerships in Canada. Handbook of climate change communication: Vol. 2 (pp. 147-160). Springer International Publishing. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-70066-3_11

Truman, E., Raine, K., Mrklas, K., Prowse, R., Carruthers Den Hoed, R., Watson-Jarvis, K., Loewen, J., Gorham, M., Ricciardi, C., Tyminski, S., Elliott, C. (2017). Promoting children’s health: Toward a consensus statement on food literacy. Canadian Journal of Public Health, 108(2), e211-213.

Elliott, C., & Carruthers Den Hoed, R. (2016). Do apples need an Elmo sticker? Children’s classification of unprocessed edibles. Critical Public Health.

Carruthers Den Hoed, R. (2016). Hipster hunters and the discursive politics of food hunting in Canada. In C. Elliott (Ed.), How Canadians communicate VI: Food promotion, consumption, controversy (pp. 203-228). University of Athabasca Press.

Spoel, P., Den Hoed, R. (2014). Places and people: Rhetorical constructions of ‘community’ in a Canadian environmental risk Aasessment. Environmental Communication. 8(3), 265-285.

Den Hoed, R. Elliott, C. (2013). Parents’ views of supermarket fun Food and the question of responsible marketing. Young Consumers 14(3): 201-215.

Elliott, C., Carruthers Den Hoed, R., Conlon, M. (2013). Food branding and young children’s taste preferences: A reassessment. Canadian Journal of Public Health, 104(5). 364-368.


Course Descriptions

WRDS 150B — Resilience

Together, we will explore the idea of resilience and how it is conceptualized and measured in different academic disciplines (engineering, economics, ecology, psychology). While resilience has been studied by scholars for centuries (the word can be traced back to the work of Francis Bacon in the 17th century), it has become especially popular since the mid-20th century, when the concept was used to study the behaviour of different complex systems: e.g., ecosystems, technical systems, cities, communities, developing human minds. While definitions vary, the term resilience generally refers to a complex system’s ability to bounce back to normal after a disaster or disruption, or a complex system’s ability to bounce forward to some ‘new normal.’ In either case, resilience is often (but not always) considered a good thing: a desirable quality, process, or goal that helps humans recover quickly and adapt productively after a shock or trauma— like a flood, hurricane, drought, power failure, financial crisis, disease outbreak, violent assault, forced relocation, terrorist attack, or even colonization, systematic oppression, symbolic violence. In response to readings, lectures, and class discussion, students will reflect on what it means to survive and thrive in the face of adversity and develop a research project that contributes to current scholarly conversations about resilience.

 

WRDS 150A — Food Citizenship

Together, we will explore the concept of food citizenship and how it is debated across different academic disciplines (e.g., anthropology, geography, indigenous studies, nutrition/health, political science, sociology). Citing a global food system dominated by ‘faceless’ transnational corporations, exploitative agricultural practices, a proliferation of calorie-dense nutrient-poor foods, growing health disparities, and a pathological obsession with eating (too much, too little, only ‘clean’ foods), scholars have begun to pay attention to the problem of cultivating good food citizens: how can we empower people to improve or radically overhaul the modern-day food system, to make it more environmentally, socially, and economically sustainable and just? Is eating local the answer? Does community gardening help? What about adopting a plant-based diet? And how can we decolonize the food system and challenge the elitism (racism, classism, sexism) inherent in some food citizenship ideals? In response to readings, lectures, and class discussion, students will reflect on what it means to be a good food citizen and develop a research project that contributes to current scholarly conversations about food citizenship.


Rebecca Carruthers den Hoed

Assistant Professor of Teaching

Ph.D. Communication Studies, University of Calgary
M.A. English (Rhetoric), Simon Fraser Univeristy
B.A. Mathematics and Rhetoric & Professional Writing, University of Waterloo

Dr. Rebecca Carruthers Den Hoed is an Assistant Professor of Teaching in the School of Journalism, Writing, and Media at UBC. Her teaching and research are focused on academic discourse, academic writing across the disciplines, research genres and genre instruction, team based learning (TBL) in writing intensive courses, discourses of science/health/environment, and discourses of food citizenship. She is especially interested studying discourses of food citizenship as a nexus for broader debates about science/health/environment.

Rebecca has taught academic writing, rhetorical theory and practice, professional and technical communication, and science and health communication at Canadian universities for nearly twenty years. She has taught at the University of Calgary and the University of Lethbridge in Alberta, and is currently teaching at the University of British Columbia.

 

Richards, G.W. & Carruthers Den Hoed, R. (2018). Seven strategies of climate change science communication for policy change: Combining academic theory with practical evidence from science-policy partnerships in Canada. Handbook of climate change communication: Vol. 2 (pp. 147-160). Springer International Publishing. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-70066-3_11

Truman, E., Raine, K., Mrklas, K., Prowse, R., Carruthers Den Hoed, R., Watson-Jarvis, K., Loewen, J., Gorham, M., Ricciardi, C., Tyminski, S., Elliott, C. (2017). Promoting children’s health: Toward a consensus statement on food literacy. Canadian Journal of Public Health, 108(2), e211-213.

Elliott, C., & Carruthers Den Hoed, R. (2016). Do apples need an Elmo sticker? Children’s classification of unprocessed edibles. Critical Public Health.

Carruthers Den Hoed, R. (2016). Hipster hunters and the discursive politics of food hunting in Canada. In C. Elliott (Ed.), How Canadians communicate VI: Food promotion, consumption, controversy (pp. 203-228). University of Athabasca Press.

Spoel, P., Den Hoed, R. (2014). Places and people: Rhetorical constructions of 'community' in a Canadian environmental risk Aasessment. Environmental Communication. 8(3), 265-285.

Den Hoed, R. Elliott, C. (2013). Parents' views of supermarket fun Food and the question of responsible marketing. Young Consumers 14(3): 201-215.

Elliott, C., Carruthers Den Hoed, R., Conlon, M. (2013). Food branding and young children's taste preferences: A reassessment. Canadian Journal of Public Health, 104(5). 364-368.

WRDS 150B — Resilience

Together, we will explore the idea of resilience and how it is conceptualized and measured in different academic disciplines (engineering, economics, ecology, psychology). While resilience has been studied by scholars for centuries (the word can be traced back to the work of Francis Bacon in the 17th century), it has become especially popular since the mid-20th century, when the concept was used to study the behaviour of different complex systems: e.g., ecosystems, technical systems, cities, communities, developing human minds. While definitions vary, the term resilience generally refers to a complex system’s ability to bounce back to normal after a disaster or disruption, or a complex system’s ability to bounce forward to some ‘new normal.’ In either case, resilience is often (but not always) considered a good thing: a desirable quality, process, or goal that helps humans recover quickly and adapt productively after a shock or trauma— like a flood, hurricane, drought, power failure, financial crisis, disease outbreak, violent assault, forced relocation, terrorist attack, or even colonization, systematic oppression, symbolic violence. In response to readings, lectures, and class discussion, students will reflect on what it means to survive and thrive in the face of adversity and develop a research project that contributes to current scholarly conversations about resilience.

 

WRDS 150A — Food Citizenship

Together, we will explore the concept of food citizenship and how it is debated across different academic disciplines (e.g., anthropology, geography, indigenous studies, nutrition/health, political science, sociology). Citing a global food system dominated by ‘faceless’ transnational corporations, exploitative agricultural practices, a proliferation of calorie-dense nutrient-poor foods, growing health disparities, and a pathological obsession with eating (too much, too little, only ‘clean’ foods), scholars have begun to pay attention to the problem of cultivating good food citizens: how can we empower people to improve or radically overhaul the modern-day food system, to make it more environmentally, socially, and economically sustainable and just? Is eating local the answer? Does community gardening help? What about adopting a plant-based diet? And how can we decolonize the food system and challenge the elitism (racism, classism, sexism) inherent in some food citizenship ideals? In response to readings, lectures, and class discussion, students will reflect on what it means to be a good food citizen and develop a research project that contributes to current scholarly conversations about food citizenship.

Rebecca Carruthers den Hoed

Assistant Professor of Teaching

Ph.D. Communication Studies, University of Calgary
M.A. English (Rhetoric), Simon Fraser Univeristy
B.A. Mathematics and Rhetoric & Professional Writing, University of Waterloo

Dr. Rebecca Carruthers Den Hoed is an Assistant Professor of Teaching in the School of Journalism, Writing, and Media at UBC. Her teaching and research are focused on academic discourse, academic writing across the disciplines, research genres and genre instruction, team based learning (TBL) in writing intensive courses, discourses of science/health/environment, and discourses of food citizenship. She is especially interested studying discourses of food citizenship as a nexus for broader debates about science/health/environment.

Rebecca has taught academic writing, rhetorical theory and practice, professional and technical communication, and science and health communication at Canadian universities for nearly twenty years. She has taught at the University of Calgary and the University of Lethbridge in Alberta, and is currently teaching at the University of British Columbia.

 

Richards, G.W. & Carruthers Den Hoed, R. (2018). Seven strategies of climate change science communication for policy change: Combining academic theory with practical evidence from science-policy partnerships in Canada. Handbook of climate change communication: Vol. 2 (pp. 147-160). Springer International Publishing. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-70066-3_11

Truman, E., Raine, K., Mrklas, K., Prowse, R., Carruthers Den Hoed, R., Watson-Jarvis, K., Loewen, J., Gorham, M., Ricciardi, C., Tyminski, S., Elliott, C. (2017). Promoting children’s health: Toward a consensus statement on food literacy. Canadian Journal of Public Health, 108(2), e211-213.

Elliott, C., & Carruthers Den Hoed, R. (2016). Do apples need an Elmo sticker? Children’s classification of unprocessed edibles. Critical Public Health.

Carruthers Den Hoed, R. (2016). Hipster hunters and the discursive politics of food hunting in Canada. In C. Elliott (Ed.), How Canadians communicate VI: Food promotion, consumption, controversy (pp. 203-228). University of Athabasca Press.

Spoel, P., Den Hoed, R. (2014). Places and people: Rhetorical constructions of 'community' in a Canadian environmental risk Aasessment. Environmental Communication. 8(3), 265-285.

Den Hoed, R. Elliott, C. (2013). Parents' views of supermarket fun Food and the question of responsible marketing. Young Consumers 14(3): 201-215.

Elliott, C., Carruthers Den Hoed, R., Conlon, M. (2013). Food branding and young children's taste preferences: A reassessment. Canadian Journal of Public Health, 104(5). 364-368.

WRDS 150B — Resilience

Together, we will explore the idea of resilience and how it is conceptualized and measured in different academic disciplines (engineering, economics, ecology, psychology). While resilience has been studied by scholars for centuries (the word can be traced back to the work of Francis Bacon in the 17th century), it has become especially popular since the mid-20th century, when the concept was used to study the behaviour of different complex systems: e.g., ecosystems, technical systems, cities, communities, developing human minds. While definitions vary, the term resilience generally refers to a complex system’s ability to bounce back to normal after a disaster or disruption, or a complex system’s ability to bounce forward to some ‘new normal.’ In either case, resilience is often (but not always) considered a good thing: a desirable quality, process, or goal that helps humans recover quickly and adapt productively after a shock or trauma— like a flood, hurricane, drought, power failure, financial crisis, disease outbreak, violent assault, forced relocation, terrorist attack, or even colonization, systematic oppression, symbolic violence. In response to readings, lectures, and class discussion, students will reflect on what it means to survive and thrive in the face of adversity and develop a research project that contributes to current scholarly conversations about resilience.

 

WRDS 150A — Food Citizenship

Together, we will explore the concept of food citizenship and how it is debated across different academic disciplines (e.g., anthropology, geography, indigenous studies, nutrition/health, political science, sociology). Citing a global food system dominated by ‘faceless’ transnational corporations, exploitative agricultural practices, a proliferation of calorie-dense nutrient-poor foods, growing health disparities, and a pathological obsession with eating (too much, too little, only ‘clean’ foods), scholars have begun to pay attention to the problem of cultivating good food citizens: how can we empower people to improve or radically overhaul the modern-day food system, to make it more environmentally, socially, and economically sustainable and just? Is eating local the answer? Does community gardening help? What about adopting a plant-based diet? And how can we decolonize the food system and challenge the elitism (racism, classism, sexism) inherent in some food citizenship ideals? In response to readings, lectures, and class discussion, students will reflect on what it means to be a good food citizen and develop a research project that contributes to current scholarly conversations about food citizenship.