Laura Baumvol

location_on BuTo

Research Area

About

Dr. Laura Baumvol has taught a range of research and academic writing and communication courses in Canadian and international institutions. She has published papers and edited journals internationally and is an investigator in multiple research projects. Her broad interests are the relationship between scholarly and public discourse, writing across the disciplines, language use for knowledge production, research-informed practices in teaching and learning, and international education. She was a recipient of the Emerging Leaders of America Scholarship (Global Affairs Canada) and advocates for the dissemination of knowledge produced by multilingual scholars from geolinguistic regions in the global periphery or semi-periphery, the promotion of students’ and instructors’ full participation in diverse scholarly discourse communities, and for an inclusive and equitable internationalization of higher education.


Additional Description

Title: Popularization and Dissemination of Scientific Knowledge

In this section of WRDS 150, we will focus on how various disciplines, such as environmental sciences, natural sciences, and computer science investigate and write about the communication of scholarly knowledge. This communication can involve (1) knowledge popularization to a broad, popular audience through a recontextualization process of text relocation from a primary scholarly context (e.g. academic journals) to a secondary popularized context (e.g. mass media, news media, magazines, YouTube, Twitter, blogs, Q&A websites, etc.); and/or (2) knowledge dissemination through the interaction with target audiences leading to potential changes in society (e.g. summaries or briefings to stakeholders; educational sessions with patients, practitioners and/or policymakers; engagement of knowledge users in developing and executing implementation plans, etc.). The replacement of the deficit model of science communication to a passive audience by one that includes a two-way interaction between the academic community and non-specialist audiences has promoted dialogue, empowerment, inclusion, and participation through the public engagement with science. The readings in the course, along with the individual and collaborative writing assignments and activities, will allow students to engage in scholarly conversations and explore multiple research genres and methods, types of data, and writing practices.


Laura Baumvol

location_on BuTo

Dr. Laura Baumvol has taught a range of research and academic writing and communication courses in Canadian and international institutions. She has published papers and edited journals internationally and is an investigator in multiple research projects. Her broad interests are the relationship between scholarly and public discourse, writing across the disciplines, language use for knowledge production, research-informed practices in teaching and learning, and international education. She was a recipient of the Emerging Leaders of America Scholarship (Global Affairs Canada) and advocates for the dissemination of knowledge produced by multilingual scholars from geolinguistic regions in the global periphery or semi-periphery, the promotion of students’ and instructors’ full participation in diverse scholarly discourse communities, and for an inclusive and equitable internationalization of higher education.

Title: Popularization and Dissemination of Scientific Knowledge

In this section of WRDS 150, we will focus on how various disciplines, such as environmental sciences, natural sciences, and computer science investigate and write about the communication of scholarly knowledge. This communication can involve (1) knowledge popularization to a broad, popular audience through a recontextualization process of text relocation from a primary scholarly context (e.g. academic journals) to a secondary popularized context (e.g. mass media, news media, magazines, YouTube, Twitter, blogs, Q&A websites, etc.); and/or (2) knowledge dissemination through the interaction with target audiences leading to potential changes in society (e.g. summaries or briefings to stakeholders; educational sessions with patients, practitioners and/or policymakers; engagement of knowledge users in developing and executing implementation plans, etc.). The replacement of the deficit model of science communication to a passive audience by one that includes a two-way interaction between the academic community and non-specialist audiences has promoted dialogue, empowerment, inclusion, and participation through the public engagement with science. The readings in the course, along with the individual and collaborative writing assignments and activities, will allow students to engage in scholarly conversations and explore multiple research genres and methods, types of data, and writing practices.

Laura Baumvol

location_on BuTo

Dr. Laura Baumvol has taught a range of research and academic writing and communication courses in Canadian and international institutions. She has published papers and edited journals internationally and is an investigator in multiple research projects. Her broad interests are the relationship between scholarly and public discourse, writing across the disciplines, language use for knowledge production, research-informed practices in teaching and learning, and international education. She was a recipient of the Emerging Leaders of America Scholarship (Global Affairs Canada) and advocates for the dissemination of knowledge produced by multilingual scholars from geolinguistic regions in the global periphery or semi-periphery, the promotion of students’ and instructors’ full participation in diverse scholarly discourse communities, and for an inclusive and equitable internationalization of higher education.

Title: Popularization and Dissemination of Scientific Knowledge

In this section of WRDS 150, we will focus on how various disciplines, such as environmental sciences, natural sciences, and computer science investigate and write about the communication of scholarly knowledge. This communication can involve (1) knowledge popularization to a broad, popular audience through a recontextualization process of text relocation from a primary scholarly context (e.g. academic journals) to a secondary popularized context (e.g. mass media, news media, magazines, YouTube, Twitter, blogs, Q&A websites, etc.); and/or (2) knowledge dissemination through the interaction with target audiences leading to potential changes in society (e.g. summaries or briefings to stakeholders; educational sessions with patients, practitioners and/or policymakers; engagement of knowledge users in developing and executing implementation plans, etc.). The replacement of the deficit model of science communication to a passive audience by one that includes a two-way interaction between the academic community and non-specialist audiences has promoted dialogue, empowerment, inclusion, and participation through the public engagement with science. The readings in the course, along with the individual and collaborative writing assignments and activities, will allow students to engage in scholarly conversations and explore multiple research genres and methods, types of data, and writing practices.