Laila Ferreira

Assistant Professor of Teaching
phone 604 822 4069
location_on BUTO 207

Research Area

Education

Ph.D. English Language and Literatures, The University of British Columbia

M.A. English (Print Culture 1700-1900), Simon Fraser University

About

Dr. Ferreira’s pedagogical practice and research is informed by her background in print culture and interest in how media and communication processes intersect with human sensation, perception, and understanding. Her approach to the teaching and learning of academic discourse and communication is interdisciplinary and grounded in rhetorical genre theory, writing studies, literary theory, disability and gender studies. Students in her academic research and writing courses in ASRW and Vantage college at UBC develop an understanding of the relationship between writing and its contexts and leave with the tools needed to recognize and analyze the situatedness of all communication.

As a member of the UBC community, Dr. Ferreira has participated in cross-campus initiatives related to innovative pedagogy, the first-year student experience, and inclusive teaching and course design that work to support accessible teaching practices for the full inclusion and success of a diverse student body. This includes Dr. Ferreira’s co-design of workshops and contribution to resources on the principles of Universal Design for Learning (UDL) as well as participation in interdisciplinary communities of practice on Indigenizing and Internationalizing the curriculum. As co-chair of the First Year Experience Educator’s Symposium, Dr. Ferreira led a team of faculty and staff from a range of different disciplines and departments to design, plan and organize the symposium as an opportunity for professional growth and community development for educators who teach and support first-year students.

Dr. Ferreira’s educational leadership activities are complemented and informed by her research in the areas of the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning and writing studies. Dr. Ferreira is co-researcher on studies that address the learning experiences of students from marginalized communities in the academic research and writing classroom (low-socioeconomic status, Disabled, International, Indigenous, LGBTQ) and the incorporation of UBC developed teaching technologies such as ComPAIR as well as inclusive teaching theories and practices such as UDL, Self-Regulated Learning, and Active and Accessible teaching. Dr. Ferreira’s current research in writing studies is a co-developed project on the language of gender in research writing on facial recognition software.

Through her research, pedagogical practice and educational leadership, Dr. Ferreira aims to create teaching and learning conditions that empower all students and instructors as collaborators in the processes of scholarly knowledge production and exchange, including reforming these processes for an inclusive and accessible university.


WRDS 150 Research Areas

Disability Studies

What are the definitions of a disabled body and mind? How were these definitions established and how have they impacted the ways in which we structure our society, from the design of our buildings and city streets to our education system and employment practices? In this class, we will grapple with these questions and more through the analysis of six scholarly articles on the topic of disability. More specifically, we will look at how each discipline’s methods of research and style of writing reflect their definitions of disability and the kinds of knowledge they produce on the topic.

Inclusive Design

While universities such as UBC are building inclusion and accessibility into their strategic plans and policies, it is not always clear what this means for teaching and learning as well as research and writing practices across the different disciplines. This section of WRDS 150 will take as its focus the concept of inclusive (also known as universal) design to analyze what inclusive design is and what it looks like in the context of non-Arts disciplines such as Science, Engineering, Forestry, Math, Computer Science, and Commerce. Throughout the term, we will evaluate the scholarly research and writing practices of these fields through academic articles about the application (or not) of inclusive design. Students will have the opportunity to engage in original research that brings inclusive design principles to the research and writing practices as well as the expected professional competencies of their fields.Disability Studies
What are the definitions of a disabled body and mind? How were these definitions established and how have they impacted the ways in which we structure our society, from the design of our buildings and city streets to our education system and employment practices? In this class, we will grapple with these questions and more through the analysis of six scholarly articles on the topic of disability. More specifically, we will look at how each discipline’s methods of research and style of writing reflect their definitions of disability and the kinds of knowledge they produce on the topic.

Office Hours: Monday 9:30-10:30 and Wednesday 3-5, or by appointment


Laila Ferreira

Assistant Professor of Teaching
phone 604 822 4069
location_on BUTO 207

Ph.D. English Language and Literatures, The University of British Columbia

M.A. English (Print Culture 1700-1900), Simon Fraser University

Dr. Ferreira’s pedagogical practice and research is informed by her background in print culture and interest in how media and communication processes intersect with human sensation, perception, and understanding. Her approach to the teaching and learning of academic discourse and communication is interdisciplinary and grounded in rhetorical genre theory, writing studies, literary theory, disability and gender studies. Students in her academic research and writing courses in ASRW and Vantage college at UBC develop an understanding of the relationship between writing and its contexts and leave with the tools needed to recognize and analyze the situatedness of all communication.

As a member of the UBC community, Dr. Ferreira has participated in cross-campus initiatives related to innovative pedagogy, the first-year student experience, and inclusive teaching and course design that work to support accessible teaching practices for the full inclusion and success of a diverse student body. This includes Dr. Ferreira’s co-design of workshops and contribution to resources on the principles of Universal Design for Learning (UDL) as well as participation in interdisciplinary communities of practice on Indigenizing and Internationalizing the curriculum. As co-chair of the First Year Experience Educator’s Symposium, Dr. Ferreira led a team of faculty and staff from a range of different disciplines and departments to design, plan and organize the symposium as an opportunity for professional growth and community development for educators who teach and support first-year students.

Dr. Ferreira’s educational leadership activities are complemented and informed by her research in the areas of the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning and writing studies. Dr. Ferreira is co-researcher on studies that address the learning experiences of students from marginalized communities in the academic research and writing classroom (low-socioeconomic status, Disabled, International, Indigenous, LGBTQ) and the incorporation of UBC developed teaching technologies such as ComPAIR as well as inclusive teaching theories and practices such as UDL, Self-Regulated Learning, and Active and Accessible teaching. Dr. Ferreira’s current research in writing studies is a co-developed project on the language of gender in research writing on facial recognition software.

Through her research, pedagogical practice and educational leadership, Dr. Ferreira aims to create teaching and learning conditions that empower all students and instructors as collaborators in the processes of scholarly knowledge production and exchange, including reforming these processes for an inclusive and accessible university.

Disability Studies

What are the definitions of a disabled body and mind? How were these definitions established and how have they impacted the ways in which we structure our society, from the design of our buildings and city streets to our education system and employment practices? In this class, we will grapple with these questions and more through the analysis of six scholarly articles on the topic of disability. More specifically, we will look at how each discipline’s methods of research and style of writing reflect their definitions of disability and the kinds of knowledge they produce on the topic.

Inclusive Design

While universities such as UBC are building inclusion and accessibility into their strategic plans and policies, it is not always clear what this means for teaching and learning as well as research and writing practices across the different disciplines. This section of WRDS 150 will take as its focus the concept of inclusive (also known as universal) design to analyze what inclusive design is and what it looks like in the context of non-Arts disciplines such as Science, Engineering, Forestry, Math, Computer Science, and Commerce. Throughout the term, we will evaluate the scholarly research and writing practices of these fields through academic articles about the application (or not) of inclusive design. Students will have the opportunity to engage in original research that brings inclusive design principles to the research and writing practices as well as the expected professional competencies of their fields.Disability Studies
What are the definitions of a disabled body and mind? How were these definitions established and how have they impacted the ways in which we structure our society, from the design of our buildings and city streets to our education system and employment practices? In this class, we will grapple with these questions and more through the analysis of six scholarly articles on the topic of disability. More specifically, we will look at how each discipline’s methods of research and style of writing reflect their definitions of disability and the kinds of knowledge they produce on the topic.

Office Hours: Monday 9:30-10:30 and Wednesday 3-5, or by appointment

Laila Ferreira

Assistant Professor of Teaching
phone 604 822 4069
location_on BUTO 207

Ph.D. English Language and Literatures, The University of British Columbia

M.A. English (Print Culture 1700-1900), Simon Fraser University

Dr. Ferreira’s pedagogical practice and research is informed by her background in print culture and interest in how media and communication processes intersect with human sensation, perception, and understanding. Her approach to the teaching and learning of academic discourse and communication is interdisciplinary and grounded in rhetorical genre theory, writing studies, literary theory, disability and gender studies. Students in her academic research and writing courses in ASRW and Vantage college at UBC develop an understanding of the relationship between writing and its contexts and leave with the tools needed to recognize and analyze the situatedness of all communication.

As a member of the UBC community, Dr. Ferreira has participated in cross-campus initiatives related to innovative pedagogy, the first-year student experience, and inclusive teaching and course design that work to support accessible teaching practices for the full inclusion and success of a diverse student body. This includes Dr. Ferreira’s co-design of workshops and contribution to resources on the principles of Universal Design for Learning (UDL) as well as participation in interdisciplinary communities of practice on Indigenizing and Internationalizing the curriculum. As co-chair of the First Year Experience Educator’s Symposium, Dr. Ferreira led a team of faculty and staff from a range of different disciplines and departments to design, plan and organize the symposium as an opportunity for professional growth and community development for educators who teach and support first-year students.

Dr. Ferreira’s educational leadership activities are complemented and informed by her research in the areas of the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning and writing studies. Dr. Ferreira is co-researcher on studies that address the learning experiences of students from marginalized communities in the academic research and writing classroom (low-socioeconomic status, Disabled, International, Indigenous, LGBTQ) and the incorporation of UBC developed teaching technologies such as ComPAIR as well as inclusive teaching theories and practices such as UDL, Self-Regulated Learning, and Active and Accessible teaching. Dr. Ferreira’s current research in writing studies is a co-developed project on the language of gender in research writing on facial recognition software.

Through her research, pedagogical practice and educational leadership, Dr. Ferreira aims to create teaching and learning conditions that empower all students and instructors as collaborators in the processes of scholarly knowledge production and exchange, including reforming these processes for an inclusive and accessible university.

Disability Studies

What are the definitions of a disabled body and mind? How were these definitions established and how have they impacted the ways in which we structure our society, from the design of our buildings and city streets to our education system and employment practices? In this class, we will grapple with these questions and more through the analysis of six scholarly articles on the topic of disability. More specifically, we will look at how each discipline’s methods of research and style of writing reflect their definitions of disability and the kinds of knowledge they produce on the topic.

Inclusive Design

While universities such as UBC are building inclusion and accessibility into their strategic plans and policies, it is not always clear what this means for teaching and learning as well as research and writing practices across the different disciplines. This section of WRDS 150 will take as its focus the concept of inclusive (also known as universal) design to analyze what inclusive design is and what it looks like in the context of non-Arts disciplines such as Science, Engineering, Forestry, Math, Computer Science, and Commerce. Throughout the term, we will evaluate the scholarly research and writing practices of these fields through academic articles about the application (or not) of inclusive design. Students will have the opportunity to engage in original research that brings inclusive design principles to the research and writing practices as well as the expected professional competencies of their fields.Disability Studies
What are the definitions of a disabled body and mind? How were these definitions established and how have they impacted the ways in which we structure our society, from the design of our buildings and city streets to our education system and employment practices? In this class, we will grapple with these questions and more through the analysis of six scholarly articles on the topic of disability. More specifically, we will look at how each discipline’s methods of research and style of writing reflect their definitions of disability and the kinds of knowledge they produce on the topic.

Office Hours: Monday 9:30-10:30 and Wednesday 3-5, or by appointment