Jennifer Cowe

location_on BUTO 206

Research Area

About

Dr. Cowe earned her PhD in American Studies from the University of Glasgow. Her doctoral thesis focused on the influence of Zen Buddhist philosophy on the life and work of Henry Miller. A monograph derived from this research, entitled Killing the Buddha: Henry Miller’s Long Journey to Satori, was published in September 2020 (Fairleigh Dickinson University Press).

Research interests include Henry Miller and the Villa Seurat Group, post-left/green anarchism, Murray Bookchin, and political science fiction.

WRDS 150 Research Area: Nostalgia


WRDS 150: Nostalgia

This course will aim to explore how different academic disciplines engage with the concept of nostalgia. Nostalgia is a word, or more usually a feeling, that most people have used or felt; however, very few understand its constant presence in everyday life. We will study nostalgia from its earliest appearance in academia as a form of mental illness in the seventeenth century and follow its growing influence over, and manipulation of, contemporary ideas of national identity, consumerism, class, lifestyle choices and LGBTQ histories. Through the study of academic journal articles from a variety of fields (psychology, history, marketing, politics, media) we will examine the research and writing techniques used by different disciplines to understand such an esoteric concept.


Jennifer Cowe

location_on BUTO 206

Dr. Cowe earned her PhD in American Studies from the University of Glasgow. Her doctoral thesis focused on the influence of Zen Buddhist philosophy on the life and work of Henry Miller. A monograph derived from this research, entitled Killing the Buddha: Henry Miller’s Long Journey to Satori, was published in September 2020 (Fairleigh Dickinson University Press).

Research interests include Henry Miller and the Villa Seurat Group, post-left/green anarchism, Murray Bookchin, and political science fiction.

WRDS 150 Research Area: Nostalgia

This course will aim to explore how different academic disciplines engage with the concept of nostalgia. Nostalgia is a word, or more usually a feeling, that most people have used or felt; however, very few understand its constant presence in everyday life. We will study nostalgia from its earliest appearance in academia as a form of mental illness in the seventeenth century and follow its growing influence over, and manipulation of, contemporary ideas of national identity, consumerism, class, lifestyle choices and LGBTQ histories. Through the study of academic journal articles from a variety of fields (psychology, history, marketing, politics, media) we will examine the research and writing techniques used by different disciplines to understand such an esoteric concept.

Jennifer Cowe

location_on BUTO 206

Dr. Cowe earned her PhD in American Studies from the University of Glasgow. Her doctoral thesis focused on the influence of Zen Buddhist philosophy on the life and work of Henry Miller. A monograph derived from this research, entitled Killing the Buddha: Henry Miller’s Long Journey to Satori, was published in September 2020 (Fairleigh Dickinson University Press).

Research interests include Henry Miller and the Villa Seurat Group, post-left/green anarchism, Murray Bookchin, and political science fiction.

WRDS 150 Research Area: Nostalgia

This course will aim to explore how different academic disciplines engage with the concept of nostalgia. Nostalgia is a word, or more usually a feeling, that most people have used or felt; however, very few understand its constant presence in everyday life. We will study nostalgia from its earliest appearance in academia as a form of mental illness in the seventeenth century and follow its growing influence over, and manipulation of, contemporary ideas of national identity, consumerism, class, lifestyle choices and LGBTQ histories. Through the study of academic journal articles from a variety of fields (psychology, history, marketing, politics, media) we will examine the research and writing techniques used by different disciplines to understand such an esoteric concept.