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Alexis McGee

Assistant Professor

Research / Teaching Area

Education

ACADEMIC POSITIONS
Assistant Professor of Writing Studies, University of British Columbia, 2021-present
Assistant Professor of English, University of Alabama, 2018-2021
Teacher of Record, English, University of Texas at San Antonio, 2014-2018
Teacher of Record, English, Texas State University, 2012-2014

EDUCATION
Ph.D.: English, University of Texas at San Antonio, San Antonio, Tx, August 2018
Concentration: Rhetoric and Composition; Linguistics
Dissertation: “The Legacy of Black Womenhood in Blues, Jazz, and Hip Hop: A Global Materialist Sonic Rhetoric Critique of
Intersectionality”
Committee: Sonja Lanehart (Chair), Joycelyn Moody, Kinitra Brooks, Marco Cervantes, Adam Banks

M.A.: English, Texas State University, San Marcos, Tx, May 2014
Concentration: Rhetoric and Composition
Thesis: “Hip Hop Pedagogy: An Alternative Praxis”
Committee: Octavio Pimentel (Chair), Nancy Wilson, Jaime Mejía

B.A.: English, Texas State University, San Marcos, Tx, May 2012
Concentration: English Literature
Minor: Biology

A.S.: Biology, Blinn Junior College, Brenham, Texas, May 2008

About

Alexis McGee received her Ph.D. from the University of Texas at San Antonio where she also received two certificates of concentration in Linguistics and Rhetoric and Composition. Her research focuses on Black Feminist Theory, African American language, literacies, and rhetorics as well as rhetorical theory and composition pedagogy. Dr. McGee has published in Pedagogy, Obsidian, as well as Computers and Composition to name a few.

 


Publications

McGee, Alexis. From Blues to Beyoncé: A Generation of Black Women’s Sonic Rhetoric. (under advance contract with SUNY Press).
Billingsley, Khadeidra and Alexis McGee. “Black Feminist Pedagogy, Extra-Institutional Mentorship, and Other Things Learned from the Black Caucus.” NCTE/CCCC: Teaching, Organizing, and Learning in the Contemporary Freedom Struggle. Edited by Jamal Cooks, David F. Green Jr., and Mudiwa Pettus. (Forthcoming).
McGee, Alexis. “(Re)Reading Sor Juana’s Rhetorics: The Intersectional, Cultural, and Feminist Rhetorician.” Rhetoric Review. vol. 40, iss, 3, 2021. (Forthcoming).

McGee, Alexis. “Beyisms: The Southern Sociolinguistic Strategies and Rhetorics in Beyoncé’s Lemonade.” Beyoncé, Black Feminism, and Spirituality: The Lemonade Reader, edited by Kinitra Brooks and Kameelah Martin, Routledge, 2019.

McGee, Alexis and J. David Cisneros. “Looking Forward, Looking Back: A Dialogue on ‘The Imperative of Racial Rhetorical Criticism.’” Special issue of Communication and Critical/Cultural Studies, vol 15, iss. 4, 2018.


Awards

Cultivating New Voices Award, National Council of Teachers of English, 2020-2022
Early Career Educator of Color Leadership Award, National Council of Teachers of English, 2014

 WRDS 150A: Listening, Reading, and Writing Voice

 This course investigates the importance of voice as it is composed through a variety of forms. What does it mean to read voice within texts? How do we listen to voices? How can we craft voice when we write? In addition to seeking answers to these questions, this course builds working definitions for the features defining voice, loosely, by engaging with scholarly conversations across discourses (sociolinguistics, writing studies, postcolonialism, etc.). By the end of this course, students should be able to identify, develop, and understand of how voice can be used rhetorically.


Alexis McGee

Assistant Professor
email

ACADEMIC POSITIONS
Assistant Professor of Writing Studies, University of British Columbia, 2021-present
Assistant Professor of English, University of Alabama, 2018-2021
Teacher of Record, English, University of Texas at San Antonio, 2014-2018
Teacher of Record, English, Texas State University, 2012-2014

EDUCATION
Ph.D.: English, University of Texas at San Antonio, San Antonio, Tx, August 2018
Concentration: Rhetoric and Composition; Linguistics
Dissertation: “The Legacy of Black Womenhood in Blues, Jazz, and Hip Hop: A Global Materialist Sonic Rhetoric Critique of
Intersectionality”
Committee: Sonja Lanehart (Chair), Joycelyn Moody, Kinitra Brooks, Marco Cervantes, Adam Banks

M.A.: English, Texas State University, San Marcos, Tx, May 2014
Concentration: Rhetoric and Composition
Thesis: “Hip Hop Pedagogy: An Alternative Praxis”
Committee: Octavio Pimentel (Chair), Nancy Wilson, Jaime Mejía

B.A.: English, Texas State University, San Marcos, Tx, May 2012
Concentration: English Literature
Minor: Biology

A.S.: Biology, Blinn Junior College, Brenham, Texas, May 2008

Alexis McGee received her Ph.D. from the University of Texas at San Antonio where she also received two certificates of concentration in Linguistics and Rhetoric and Composition. Her research focuses on Black Feminist Theory, African American language, literacies, and rhetorics as well as rhetorical theory and composition pedagogy. Dr. McGee has published in Pedagogy, Obsidian, as well as Computers and Composition to name a few.

 

McGee, Alexis. From Blues to Beyoncé: A Generation of Black Women’s Sonic Rhetoric. (under advance contract with SUNY Press).
Billingsley, Khadeidra and Alexis McGee. “Black Feminist Pedagogy, Extra-Institutional Mentorship, and Other Things Learned from the Black Caucus.” NCTE/CCCC: Teaching, Organizing, and Learning in the Contemporary Freedom Struggle. Edited by Jamal Cooks, David F. Green Jr., and Mudiwa Pettus. (Forthcoming).
McGee, Alexis. “(Re)Reading Sor Juana’s Rhetorics: The Intersectional, Cultural, and Feminist Rhetorician.” Rhetoric Review. vol. 40, iss, 3, 2021. (Forthcoming).

McGee, Alexis. “Beyisms: The Southern Sociolinguistic Strategies and Rhetorics in Beyoncé’s Lemonade.” Beyoncé, Black Feminism, and Spirituality: The Lemonade Reader, edited by Kinitra Brooks and Kameelah Martin, Routledge, 2019.

McGee, Alexis and J. David Cisneros. “Looking Forward, Looking Back: A Dialogue on ‘The Imperative of Racial Rhetorical Criticism.’” Special issue of Communication and Critical/Cultural Studies, vol 15, iss. 4, 2018.

Cultivating New Voices Award, National Council of Teachers of English, 2020-2022
Early Career Educator of Color Leadership Award, National Council of Teachers of English, 2014

 This course investigates the importance of voice as it is composed through a variety of forms. What does it mean to read voice within texts? How do we listen to voices? How can we craft voice when we write? In addition to seeking answers to these questions, this course builds working definitions for the features defining voice, loosely, by engaging with scholarly conversations across discourses (sociolinguistics, writing studies, postcolonialism, etc.). By the end of this course, students should be able to identify, develop, and understand of how voice can be used rhetorically.

Alexis McGee

Assistant Professor
email

ACADEMIC POSITIONS
Assistant Professor of Writing Studies, University of British Columbia, 2021-present
Assistant Professor of English, University of Alabama, 2018-2021
Teacher of Record, English, University of Texas at San Antonio, 2014-2018
Teacher of Record, English, Texas State University, 2012-2014

EDUCATION
Ph.D.: English, University of Texas at San Antonio, San Antonio, Tx, August 2018
Concentration: Rhetoric and Composition; Linguistics
Dissertation: “The Legacy of Black Womenhood in Blues, Jazz, and Hip Hop: A Global Materialist Sonic Rhetoric Critique of
Intersectionality”
Committee: Sonja Lanehart (Chair), Joycelyn Moody, Kinitra Brooks, Marco Cervantes, Adam Banks

M.A.: English, Texas State University, San Marcos, Tx, May 2014
Concentration: Rhetoric and Composition
Thesis: “Hip Hop Pedagogy: An Alternative Praxis”
Committee: Octavio Pimentel (Chair), Nancy Wilson, Jaime Mejía

B.A.: English, Texas State University, San Marcos, Tx, May 2012
Concentration: English Literature
Minor: Biology

A.S.: Biology, Blinn Junior College, Brenham, Texas, May 2008

Alexis McGee received her Ph.D. from the University of Texas at San Antonio where she also received two certificates of concentration in Linguistics and Rhetoric and Composition. Her research focuses on Black Feminist Theory, African American language, literacies, and rhetorics as well as rhetorical theory and composition pedagogy. Dr. McGee has published in Pedagogy, Obsidian, as well as Computers and Composition to name a few.

 

McGee, Alexis. From Blues to Beyoncé: A Generation of Black Women’s Sonic Rhetoric. (under advance contract with SUNY Press).
Billingsley, Khadeidra and Alexis McGee. “Black Feminist Pedagogy, Extra-Institutional Mentorship, and Other Things Learned from the Black Caucus.” NCTE/CCCC: Teaching, Organizing, and Learning in the Contemporary Freedom Struggle. Edited by Jamal Cooks, David F. Green Jr., and Mudiwa Pettus. (Forthcoming).
McGee, Alexis. “(Re)Reading Sor Juana’s Rhetorics: The Intersectional, Cultural, and Feminist Rhetorician.” Rhetoric Review. vol. 40, iss, 3, 2021. (Forthcoming).

McGee, Alexis. “Beyisms: The Southern Sociolinguistic Strategies and Rhetorics in Beyoncé’s Lemonade.” Beyoncé, Black Feminism, and Spirituality: The Lemonade Reader, edited by Kinitra Brooks and Kameelah Martin, Routledge, 2019.

McGee, Alexis and J. David Cisneros. “Looking Forward, Looking Back: A Dialogue on ‘The Imperative of Racial Rhetorical Criticism.’” Special issue of Communication and Critical/Cultural Studies, vol 15, iss. 4, 2018.

Cultivating New Voices Award, National Council of Teachers of English, 2020-2022
Early Career Educator of Color Leadership Award, National Council of Teachers of English, 2014

 This course investigates the importance of voice as it is composed through a variety of forms. What does it mean to read voice within texts? How do we listen to voices? How can we craft voice when we write? In addition to seeking answers to these questions, this course builds working definitions for the features defining voice, loosely, by engaging with scholarly conversations across discourses (sociolinguistics, writing studies, postcolonialism, etc.). By the end of this course, students should be able to identify, develop, and understand of how voice can be used rhetorically.