Sara Doody

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Research Area

About

I’m a recent PhD graduate in Education from McGill University and hold an MA in Applied Linguistics and Discourse Studies from Carleton University. My research and teaching both focus on rhetorical genre theory approaches to language and writing. I’m especially interested in interdisciplinary writing and the unique demands and expectations such fields have for students and academics alike. My most recent work has explored how interdisciplinary doctoral writers navigate multiple expectations about “good” writing and how developing genre toolkits help empower them in their research and careers.


WRDS 150: Social Media in Society

We live in a media-rich world where we are constantly inundated with information, challenges, and notifications. With access to and participation in social media platforms proliferating across the globe, our involvement in such apps has become a topic of great interest academically and in our everyday lives. Now more than ever, we’ve had to ask important questions about the role of social media in our lives ranging from the practical (e.g., how social media may be used to establish an independent brand and facilitate entrepreneurship, how it might be used to promote information about health and well-being, how we use social media to maintain and develop relationships) to the ethical (e.g., how healthy it is commodifying individuals, confronting both physical and mental health risks, approaching content creation ethically and conscientiously). By deconstructing how questions about social media have been taken up and communicated in research writing across different disciplines, we’ll learn how to identify different research methods, goals, data, written conventions (i.e., style, citation practices, language choices), revision practices, and writing strategies. We’ll be using social media as an entry point to discuss knowledge, research, and writing practices in fields like media studies, health studies, and business.


Sara Doody

email
location_on BuTo

I'm a recent PhD graduate in Education from McGill University and hold an MA in Applied Linguistics and Discourse Studies from Carleton University. My research and teaching both focus on rhetorical genre theory approaches to language and writing. I'm especially interested in interdisciplinary writing and the unique demands and expectations such fields have for students and academics alike. My most recent work has explored how interdisciplinary doctoral writers navigate multiple expectations about "good" writing and how developing genre toolkits help empower them in their research and careers.

We live in a media-rich world where we are constantly inundated with information, challenges, and notifications. With access to and participation in social media platforms proliferating across the globe, our involvement in such apps has become a topic of great interest academically and in our everyday lives. Now more than ever, we’ve had to ask important questions about the role of social media in our lives ranging from the practical (e.g., how social media may be used to establish an independent brand and facilitate entrepreneurship, how it might be used to promote information about health and well-being, how we use social media to maintain and develop relationships) to the ethical (e.g., how healthy it is commodifying individuals, confronting both physical and mental health risks, approaching content creation ethically and conscientiously). By deconstructing how questions about social media have been taken up and communicated in research writing across different disciplines, we’ll learn how to identify different research methods, goals, data, written conventions (i.e., style, citation practices, language choices), revision practices, and writing strategies. We'll be using social media as an entry point to discuss knowledge, research, and writing practices in fields like media studies, health studies, and business.

Sara Doody

email
location_on BuTo

I'm a recent PhD graduate in Education from McGill University and hold an MA in Applied Linguistics and Discourse Studies from Carleton University. My research and teaching both focus on rhetorical genre theory approaches to language and writing. I'm especially interested in interdisciplinary writing and the unique demands and expectations such fields have for students and academics alike. My most recent work has explored how interdisciplinary doctoral writers navigate multiple expectations about "good" writing and how developing genre toolkits help empower them in their research and careers.

We live in a media-rich world where we are constantly inundated with information, challenges, and notifications. With access to and participation in social media platforms proliferating across the globe, our involvement in such apps has become a topic of great interest academically and in our everyday lives. Now more than ever, we’ve had to ask important questions about the role of social media in our lives ranging from the practical (e.g., how social media may be used to establish an independent brand and facilitate entrepreneurship, how it might be used to promote information about health and well-being, how we use social media to maintain and develop relationships) to the ethical (e.g., how healthy it is commodifying individuals, confronting both physical and mental health risks, approaching content creation ethically and conscientiously). By deconstructing how questions about social media have been taken up and communicated in research writing across different disciplines, we’ll learn how to identify different research methods, goals, data, written conventions (i.e., style, citation practices, language choices), revision practices, and writing strategies. We'll be using social media as an entry point to discuss knowledge, research, and writing practices in fields like media studies, health studies, and business.