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Eternity Martis

Asper Visiting Professor

Research / Teaching Area

Education

MJ, Ryerson University, 2016

Bachelor of Arts (Honours), Western University, 2014

Certificate in Writing, Western University, 2014

About

Eternity Martis is an award-winning Toronto-based journalist. She is the former senior editor and health editor at Xtra magazine and worked as a producer at CTV and CBC Radio.

She was a 2017 National Magazine Awards finalist for Best New Writer and the 2018 winner of the Canadian Online Publishing Awards for Best Investigative Article. Her work has appeared in Vice, Huffington Post, The Walrus, CBC, Hazlitt, Chatelaine, Maclean’s, Complex, Salon, and on academic syllabuses around the world. Her work on race and language has influenced media style guide to capitalize Black and Indigenous across the country. She is the course developer and instructor of Reporting on Race: The Black Community in the Media at Ryerson University, the first of its kind in Canada. Last term, she was an adjunct professor in the Gender, Race, Sexuality and Social Justice at UBC and the 2021 Journalist-in-Residence at UBC. She earned an honours BA and a Certificate in Writing from Western University and an MJ from Ryerson University. In 2020, she was named one of Canada’s Top 100 Most Powerful Women by Women’s Executive Network.

Her bestselling debut memoir, They Said This Would Be Fun, was a “Best Book of the Year” pick by Globe and Mail, Apple, Audible and Chapters/Indigo. CBC called the book one of “20 moving Canadian memoirs to read right now” and PopSugar named it one of “5 Books About Race on College Campuses Every Student Should Read.” This year, They Said This Would Be Fun won the Kobo Emerging Writer Prize for Non-Fiction and is a finalist for the upcoming Evergreen Award. The TV/Film rights to the memoir have been sold to Temple Street Productions, a division of Boat Rocker Media.

She is currently working on a series with the West End Phoenix called “Black in the Jury Box,” as part of its Joe Burke Fund for Social Justice Reporting, where she is examining the systemic issues that keep Black people from serving as jurors in Ontario.


Research

Using an intersectional, anti-oppressive lens, Martis’s research and public scholarship examines how systemic and institutional racism affects Black communities and their ability to thrive in society. She examines the individual and collective effects of systemic oppression by looking at past and present history, as well as through the lived experiences of Black people. Using public scholarship, Martis writes multidimensional stories that fill a knowledge gap in our understanding of Black communities and help create social, political and institutional change.

Martis’s research interests include identity politics, gender based-violence, and racism in the institutions of healthcare, education, justice and media.


Publications

Forthcoming book, McClelland & Stewart (TBD)
Martis, Eternity. They Said This Would Be Fun: Race, Campus Life, and Growing Up (2020). McClelland & Stewart
Martis, Eternity, French, Whitney, Cooper Afua, et al. Black Writers Matter (2019). University of Regina Press


Awards

2021: Kobo’s Emerging Writer Prize for Non-Fiction for They Said This Would Be Fun

2021: Gold (contributor) Best Editorial Package, “Letters to America,” Maclean’s, National Magazine Awards

2021: Four time award-winning editor, Canadian Association of Journalists, National Magazine Awards and Digital Publishing Awards

2020: Winner of Women’s Executive Network’s Top 100: Powerful Women in Canada award

2020: Evergreen Award finalist (TBD)

2020 — Gold, Best News Coverage, “Rainbow Votes,” Digital Publishing Awards

2018 —Gold, Best Investigative Feature, “The Health Effects of Anti-Black Racism,” The Local, Canadian Online Publishing Awards  

2018 — Gold (editor), “What It’s Like to Talk to Your Doctor About Sexual Health When You’re Bisexual,” Xtra. NLGJA Awards

2017 —Gold (contributor), Best Digital Initiative for “Why Diversity?” Ryerson Review of Journalism, Digital Publishing Awards  

2017 —Finalist, Best New Writer for “Know Your History, Know Your Greatness,” Hazlitt, National Magazine Awards

2017 —Finalist, Best Editorial Package for Ryerson Review of Journalism, Digital Publishing Awards  

2017 —Finalist (editor), Best Personal Essay for “When Queer Mentorship Comes in the Form of Cling Wrap,” Xtra. Digital Publishing Awards

 


Eternity Martis

Asper Visiting Professor

MJ, Ryerson University, 2016

Bachelor of Arts (Honours), Western University, 2014

Certificate in Writing, Western University, 2014

Eternity Martis is an award-winning Toronto-based journalist. She is the former senior editor and health editor at Xtra magazine and worked as a producer at CTV and CBC Radio.

She was a 2017 National Magazine Awards finalist for Best New Writer and the 2018 winner of the Canadian Online Publishing Awards for Best Investigative Article. Her work has appeared in Vice, Huffington Post, The Walrus, CBC, Hazlitt, Chatelaine, Maclean’s, Complex, Salon, and on academic syllabuses around the world. Her work on race and language has influenced media style guide to capitalize Black and Indigenous across the country. She is the course developer and instructor of Reporting on Race: The Black Community in the Media at Ryerson University, the first of its kind in Canada. Last term, she was an adjunct professor in the Gender, Race, Sexuality and Social Justice at UBC and the 2021 Journalist-in-Residence at UBC. She earned an honours BA and a Certificate in Writing from Western University and an MJ from Ryerson University. In 2020, she was named one of Canada's Top 100 Most Powerful Women by Women's Executive Network.

Her bestselling debut memoir, They Said This Would Be Fun, was a "Best Book of the Year" pick by Globe and Mail, Apple, Audible and Chapters/Indigo. CBC called the book one of "20 moving Canadian memoirs to read right now" and PopSugar named it one of "5 Books About Race on College Campuses Every Student Should Read." This year, They Said This Would Be Fun won the Kobo Emerging Writer Prize for Non-Fiction and is a finalist for the upcoming Evergreen Award. The TV/Film rights to the memoir have been sold to Temple Street Productions, a division of Boat Rocker Media.

She is currently working on a series with the West End Phoenix called “Black in the Jury Box,” as part of its Joe Burke Fund for Social Justice Reporting, where she is examining the systemic issues that keep Black people from serving as jurors in Ontario.

Using an intersectional, anti-oppressive lens, Martis’s research and public scholarship examines how systemic and institutional racism affects Black communities and their ability to thrive in society. She examines the individual and collective effects of systemic oppression by looking at past and present history, as well as through the lived experiences of Black people. Using public scholarship, Martis writes multidimensional stories that fill a knowledge gap in our understanding of Black communities and help create social, political and institutional change.

Martis’s research interests include identity politics, gender based-violence, and racism in the institutions of healthcare, education, justice and media.

Forthcoming book, McClelland & Stewart (TBD)
Martis, Eternity. They Said This Would Be Fun: Race, Campus Life, and Growing Up (2020). McClelland & Stewart
Martis, Eternity, French, Whitney, Cooper Afua, et al. Black Writers Matter (2019). University of Regina Press

2021: Kobo’s Emerging Writer Prize for Non-Fiction for They Said This Would Be Fun

2021: Gold (contributor) Best Editorial Package, “Letters to America,” Maclean’s, National Magazine Awards

2021: Four time award-winning editor, Canadian Association of Journalists, National Magazine Awards and Digital Publishing Awards

2020: Winner of Women’s Executive Network’s Top 100: Powerful Women in Canada award

2020: Evergreen Award finalist (TBD)

2020 — Gold, Best News Coverage, “Rainbow Votes,” Digital Publishing Awards

2018 —Gold, Best Investigative Feature, “The Health Effects of Anti-Black Racism,” The Local, Canadian Online Publishing Awards  

2018 — Gold (editor), “What It’s Like to Talk to Your Doctor About Sexual Health When You’re Bisexual,” Xtra. NLGJA Awards

2017 —Gold (contributor), Best Digital Initiative for “Why Diversity?” Ryerson Review of Journalism, Digital Publishing Awards  

2017 —Finalist, Best New Writer for “Know Your History, Know Your Greatness,” Hazlitt, National Magazine Awards

2017 —Finalist, Best Editorial Package for Ryerson Review of Journalism, Digital Publishing Awards  

2017 —Finalist (editor), Best Personal Essay for “When Queer Mentorship Comes in the Form of Cling Wrap,” Xtra. Digital Publishing Awards

 

Eternity Martis

Asper Visiting Professor

MJ, Ryerson University, 2016

Bachelor of Arts (Honours), Western University, 2014

Certificate in Writing, Western University, 2014

Eternity Martis is an award-winning Toronto-based journalist. She is the former senior editor and health editor at Xtra magazine and worked as a producer at CTV and CBC Radio.

She was a 2017 National Magazine Awards finalist for Best New Writer and the 2018 winner of the Canadian Online Publishing Awards for Best Investigative Article. Her work has appeared in Vice, Huffington Post, The Walrus, CBC, Hazlitt, Chatelaine, Maclean’s, Complex, Salon, and on academic syllabuses around the world. Her work on race and language has influenced media style guide to capitalize Black and Indigenous across the country. She is the course developer and instructor of Reporting on Race: The Black Community in the Media at Ryerson University, the first of its kind in Canada. Last term, she was an adjunct professor in the Gender, Race, Sexuality and Social Justice at UBC and the 2021 Journalist-in-Residence at UBC. She earned an honours BA and a Certificate in Writing from Western University and an MJ from Ryerson University. In 2020, she was named one of Canada's Top 100 Most Powerful Women by Women's Executive Network.

Her bestselling debut memoir, They Said This Would Be Fun, was a "Best Book of the Year" pick by Globe and Mail, Apple, Audible and Chapters/Indigo. CBC called the book one of "20 moving Canadian memoirs to read right now" and PopSugar named it one of "5 Books About Race on College Campuses Every Student Should Read." This year, They Said This Would Be Fun won the Kobo Emerging Writer Prize for Non-Fiction and is a finalist for the upcoming Evergreen Award. The TV/Film rights to the memoir have been sold to Temple Street Productions, a division of Boat Rocker Media.

She is currently working on a series with the West End Phoenix called “Black in the Jury Box,” as part of its Joe Burke Fund for Social Justice Reporting, where she is examining the systemic issues that keep Black people from serving as jurors in Ontario.

Using an intersectional, anti-oppressive lens, Martis’s research and public scholarship examines how systemic and institutional racism affects Black communities and their ability to thrive in society. She examines the individual and collective effects of systemic oppression by looking at past and present history, as well as through the lived experiences of Black people. Using public scholarship, Martis writes multidimensional stories that fill a knowledge gap in our understanding of Black communities and help create social, political and institutional change.

Martis’s research interests include identity politics, gender based-violence, and racism in the institutions of healthcare, education, justice and media.

Forthcoming book, McClelland & Stewart (TBD)
Martis, Eternity. They Said This Would Be Fun: Race, Campus Life, and Growing Up (2020). McClelland & Stewart
Martis, Eternity, French, Whitney, Cooper Afua, et al. Black Writers Matter (2019). University of Regina Press

2021: Kobo’s Emerging Writer Prize for Non-Fiction for They Said This Would Be Fun

2021: Gold (contributor) Best Editorial Package, “Letters to America,” Maclean’s, National Magazine Awards

2021: Four time award-winning editor, Canadian Association of Journalists, National Magazine Awards and Digital Publishing Awards

2020: Winner of Women’s Executive Network’s Top 100: Powerful Women in Canada award

2020: Evergreen Award finalist (TBD)

2020 — Gold, Best News Coverage, “Rainbow Votes,” Digital Publishing Awards

2018 —Gold, Best Investigative Feature, “The Health Effects of Anti-Black Racism,” The Local, Canadian Online Publishing Awards  

2018 — Gold (editor), “What It’s Like to Talk to Your Doctor About Sexual Health When You’re Bisexual,” Xtra. NLGJA Awards

2017 —Gold (contributor), Best Digital Initiative for “Why Diversity?” Ryerson Review of Journalism, Digital Publishing Awards  

2017 —Finalist, Best New Writer for “Know Your History, Know Your Greatness,” Hazlitt, National Magazine Awards

2017 —Finalist, Best Editorial Package for Ryerson Review of Journalism, Digital Publishing Awards  

2017 —Finalist (editor), Best Personal Essay for “When Queer Mentorship Comes in the Form of Cling Wrap,” Xtra. Digital Publishing Awards