Deo Nizonkiza

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Research Area

About

Deo Nizonkiza holds a PhD in Applied Linguistics (University of Antwerp, Belgium, 2012). Upon completion of his PhD, he undertook his postdoc research (North West University, South Africa) with a focus on the relationship between vocabulary, especially lexical phrases, such as powerful computer but not *strong computer, and academic literacy of university first-year students.  Before joining Arts Studies in Research and Writing, Deo taught at different institutions here in Canada and abroad. Among other things, he taught writing and English for Academic Purposes (EAP) courses at the University of Burundi (Burundi), Douglas College, and McGill University. Deo has a few publications on the topic of lexical phrases in peer-reviewed journals. Currently, he is examining the role of corpus tools, such as COCA (Corpus of Contemporary American English), in teaching lexical phrases prominent in academic writing to improve university students’ written communication in English.


Additional Description

Everybody has a story to tell! In this section of WRDS 150B, students examine the questions related to storytelling across disciplines. By examining the way such questions have been explored by scholars from different disciplines, such as Information Communication Technology, Health Sciences, and Engineering, students are expected to learn and familiarize themselves with scholarly practices through this topic of storytelling. Among other things, students will explore the nature of research questions scholars from different disciplines ask, the methodologies devised to answer them, and how they report the results. Through readings and related writing tasks and discussions, students will get used to writing conventions and principles. Students will then develop their own writing strategies which they will apply as they develop their own research projects as the course progresses.


Deo Nizonkiza

location_on BuTo

Deo Nizonkiza holds a PhD in Applied Linguistics (University of Antwerp, Belgium, 2012). Upon completion of his PhD, he undertook his postdoc research (North West University, South Africa) with a focus on the relationship between vocabulary, especially lexical phrases, such as powerful computer but not *strong computer, and academic literacy of university first-year students.  Before joining Arts Studies in Research and Writing, Deo taught at different institutions here in Canada and abroad. Among other things, he taught writing and English for Academic Purposes (EAP) courses at the University of Burundi (Burundi), Douglas College, and McGill University. Deo has a few publications on the topic of lexical phrases in peer-reviewed journals. Currently, he is examining the role of corpus tools, such as COCA (Corpus of Contemporary American English), in teaching lexical phrases prominent in academic writing to improve university students’ written communication in English.

Everybody has a story to tell! In this section of WRDS 150B, students examine the questions related to storytelling across disciplines. By examining the way such questions have been explored by scholars from different disciplines, such as Information Communication Technology, Health Sciences, and Engineering, students are expected to learn and familiarize themselves with scholarly practices through this topic of storytelling. Among other things, students will explore the nature of research questions scholars from different disciplines ask, the methodologies devised to answer them, and how they report the results. Through readings and related writing tasks and discussions, students will get used to writing conventions and principles. Students will then develop their own writing strategies which they will apply as they develop their own research projects as the course progresses.

Deo Nizonkiza

location_on BuTo

Deo Nizonkiza holds a PhD in Applied Linguistics (University of Antwerp, Belgium, 2012). Upon completion of his PhD, he undertook his postdoc research (North West University, South Africa) with a focus on the relationship between vocabulary, especially lexical phrases, such as powerful computer but not *strong computer, and academic literacy of university first-year students.  Before joining Arts Studies in Research and Writing, Deo taught at different institutions here in Canada and abroad. Among other things, he taught writing and English for Academic Purposes (EAP) courses at the University of Burundi (Burundi), Douglas College, and McGill University. Deo has a few publications on the topic of lexical phrases in peer-reviewed journals. Currently, he is examining the role of corpus tools, such as COCA (Corpus of Contemporary American English), in teaching lexical phrases prominent in academic writing to improve university students’ written communication in English.

Everybody has a story to tell! In this section of WRDS 150B, students examine the questions related to storytelling across disciplines. By examining the way such questions have been explored by scholars from different disciplines, such as Information Communication Technology, Health Sciences, and Engineering, students are expected to learn and familiarize themselves with scholarly practices through this topic of storytelling. Among other things, students will explore the nature of research questions scholars from different disciplines ask, the methodologies devised to answer them, and how they report the results. Through readings and related writing tasks and discussions, students will get used to writing conventions and principles. Students will then develop their own writing strategies which they will apply as they develop their own research projects as the course progresses.